Gassed

John Singer Sargent

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Born of an American father, Sargent is thought of primarily as a portrait painter. His controversial painting of Madame Gautreau, shown in a Paris Salon in 1884, was described as erotic and caused a sensation among art critics as well as the public. To avoid further scandal Sargent moved to England to re-establish himself.  In the United States, Sargent created a series of decorative paintings for the Boston Public Library and the Museum of Fine Arts.

In 1918 Sargent was asked to create a painting that depicted the cooperation between the U.S. and Britain during the First World War. Sergeant set off to France along with British painter, Henry Tonks, to visit sites that would inform his work. While he was in France he visited at a casualty station where a group of soldiers blinded by mustard gas were being attended. Sargent used this subject to create a memorable painting, Gassed, which soon became ones of the most haunting pictures of the war. During his time in France he also painted The Interior of a Hospital Tent and A Street in Arras.

 

Gassed

 

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