Education Standards in Discussion and Action Guide

 

Activities, questions, and research opportunities presented in Voices in Wartime Discussion and Action module correspond directly to all 12 standards for English Language Arts as presented by the National Council of Teachers of English, and selected standards for the teaching of world history, grades 5-12 as outlined by The National Center for History in the Schools.  

Standards that relate directly to the material, activities, exercises, and research in the module are included here:  

  Standards for the English Language Arts  

1.   Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

2.   Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.

3.   Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

4.  Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes. 

5.   Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes. 

6.   Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and non-print texts. 

7.   Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and non-print texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience.

8.   Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge. 

9.   Students develop an understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns, and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles. 

10.  Students whose first language is not English make use of their first language to develop competency in the English language arts and to develop understanding of content across the curriculum.  11.  Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.
12.  Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).    

The National Center for History in the Schools—Selected Standards Grades 5-12

Standards in Historical Thinking

■      Historical Thinking Standard 1: Chronological Thinking

■      Historical Thinking Standard 2: Historical Comprehension

■      Historical Thinking Standard 3: Historical Analysis and Interpretation

■      Historical Thinking Standard 4: Historical Research Capabilities

■      Historical Thinking Standard 5: Historical Issues-Analysis and Decision-Making

■      Putting Historical Thinking Skills to Work

 

Standard 1
The student thinks chronologically:Therefore, the student is able to

  1. Distinguish between past, present, and future time.
  2. Identify the temporal structure of a historical narrative or story: its beginning, middle, and end (the latter defined as the outcome of a particular beginning). 
  3. Establish temporal order in constructing their [students’] own historical narratives: working forward from some beginning through its development, to some end or outcome; working backward from some issue, problem, or event to explain its origins and its development over time.

 Standard 2
The student comprehends a variety of historical sources:Therefore, the student is able to

  1. Identify the author or source of the historical document or narrative.
  2. Reconstruct the literal meaning of a historical passage by identifying who was involved, what happened, where it happened, what events led to these developments, and what consequences or outcomes followed. 
  3. Identify the central question(s) the historical narrative addresses and the purpose, perspective, or point of view from which it has been constructed.
  4. Differentiate between historical facts and historical interpretations but acknowledge that the two are related; that the facts the historian reports are selected and reflect therefore the historian’s judgment of what is most significant about the past.

 Standard 3
The student engages in historical analysis and interpretation:
Therefore, the student is able to

  1. Compare and contrast differing sets of ideas, values, personalities, behaviors, and institutions by identifying likenesses and differences. 
  2. Consider multiple perspectives of various peoples in the past by demonstrating their differing motives, beliefs, interests, hopes, and fears.
  3. Analyze cause-and-effect relationships bearing in mind multiple causation including (a) the importance of the individual in history; (b) the influence of ideas, human interests, and beliefs; and (c) the role of chance, the accidental and the irrational.
  4. Draw comparisons across eras and regions in order to define enduring issues as well as large-scale or long-term developments that transcend regional and temporal boundaries.
  5. Distinguish between unsupported expressions of opinion and informed hypotheses grounded in historical evidence.

 Standard 4
The student conducts historical research:Therefore, the student is able to

  1. Formulate historical questions from encounters with historical documents, eyewitness accounts, letters, diaries, artifacts, photos, historical sites, art, architecture, and other records from the past. 
  2. Obtain historical data from a variety of sources, including: library and museum collections, historic sites, historical photos, journals, diaries, eyewitness accounts, newspapers, and the like; documentary films, oral testimony from living witnesses, censuses, tax records, city directories, statistical compilations, and economic indicators.  

Standard 5
The student engages in historical issues-analysis and decision-making:Therefore, the student is able to

  1. Identify issues and problems in the past and analyze the interests, values, perspectives, and points of view of those involved in the situation.
  2. Marshal evidence of antecedent circumstances and current factors contributing to contemporary problems and alternative courses of action.
  3. Identify relevant historical antecedents and differentiate from those that are inappropriate and irrelevant to contemporary issues.
  4. Evaluate alternative courses of action, keeping in mind the information available at the time, in terms of ethical considerations, the interests of those affected by the decision, and the long- and short-term consequences of each.
  5. Formulate a position or course of action on an issue by identifying the nature of the problem, analyzing the underlying factors contributing to the problem, and choosing a plausible solution from a choice of carefully evaluated options.
  6. Evaluate the implementation of a decision by analyzing the interests it served; estimating the position, power, and priority of each player involved; assessing the ethical dimensions of the decision; and evaluating its costs and benefits from a variety of perspectives.