Education Standards Supported in The Vietnam War

Activities, questions, and research opportunities presented in the Vietnam War correspond directly to all 12 standards for English Language Arts as presented by the National Council of Teachers of English; selected standards for arts education as outlined in the National Standards for Art Education; and selected standards for the teaching of world history, grades 5-12 as outlined by The National Center for History in the Schools.


 
Standards that relate directly to the material, activities, exercises, and research in Vietnam War are included here:
 
Standards for the English Language Arts
1.   Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.
2.   Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.
3.   Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).
4.   Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.
5.   Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.
6.   Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and non-print texts.
7.   Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and non-print texts, artifacts, people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience.
8.   Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.
9.   Students develop an understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns, and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles.
10.  Students whose first language is not English make use of their first language to develop competency in the English language arts and to develop understanding of content across the curriculum.
11.  Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.
12.  Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).
 
Painting from Mekong Diaries
 
National Standards for Arts Education—Developed by the Consortium of National Arts Education Associations
 
Understanding the visual arts in relation to history and cultures
 
Achievement Standard:
      Students differentiate among a variety of historical and cultural contexts in terms of characteristics and purposes of works of art
      Students describe the function and explore the meaning of specific art objects within varied cultures, times, and places
      Students analyze relationships of works of art to one another in terms of history, aesthetics, and culture, justifying conclusions made in the analysis and using such conclusions to inform their own art making
 
Achievement Standard—Advanced:
      Students analyze and interpret artworks for relationships among form, context, purposes, and critical models, showing understanding of the work of critics, historians, aestheticians, and artists
      Students analyze common characteristics of visual arts evident across time and among cultural/ethnic groups to formulate analyses, evaluations, and interpretations of meaning
 
Understanding the visual arts in relation to history and cultures
 
Achievement Standard:
      Students differentiate among a variety of historical and cultural contexts in terms of characteristics and purposes of works of art
      Students describe the function and explore the meaning of specific art objects within varied cultures, times, and places
 
      Students analyze relationships of works of art to one another in terms of history, aesthetics, and culture, justifying conclusions made in the analysis and using such conclusions to inform their own art making
 
Achievement Standard—Advanced:
      Students analyze and interpret artworks for relationships among form, context, purposes, and critical models, showing understanding of the work of critics, historians, aestheticians, and artists
      Students analyze common characteristics of visual arts evident across time and among cultural/ethnic groups to formulate analyses, evaluations, and interpretations of meaning
 
Viet Cong dead after an attack on the perimeter of Tan Son Nhut Air Base
The National Center for History in the Schools—Selected Standards Grades 5-12
 
Era 9: Postwar United States,1945 to early 1970s

Standard 2C: The student understands the foreign and domestic consequences of U.S. involvement in Vietnam. 

      Assess the Vietnam policy of the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations and the shifts of public opinion about the war. [Analyze multiple causation]
      Explain the composition of the American forces recruited to fight the war. [Interrogate historical data] 
      Evaluate how Vietnamese and Americans experienced the war and how the war continued to affect postwar politics and culture. [Appreciate historical perspectives] 
      Explain the provisions of the Paris Peace Accord of 1973 and evaluate the role of the Nixon administration. [Differentiate between historical facts and historical]
      Analyze the constitutional issues involved in the war and explore the legacy of the Vietnam war. [Formulate a position or course of action on an issue] 
 
Era 10: Contemporary United States, 1968 to the present
Standard 1A: The student understands domestic politics from Nixon to Carter. 
      Explain the Nixon administration’s involvement in Watergate and examine the role of the media in exposing the scandal. [Formulate historical questions] 
      Analyze the constitutional issues raised by the Watergate affair and evaluate the effects of Watergate on public opinion. [Examine the influence of ideas] 
 
Standard 2B: The student understands the new immigration and demographic shifts. 
      Analyze the new immigration policies after 1965 and the push-pull factors that prompted a new wave of immigrants. [Analyze cause-and-effect relationships]
      Identify the major issues that affected immigrants and explain the conflicts these issues engendered. [Identify issues and problems in the past]